We received the following announcement from Taco Comfort Solutions about their commercial pumps and wanted to pass it along.

New and Improved Commercial Pump Nameplates Are On Their Way!

We are excited to introduce you to our newly designed nameplates. We’ve tried to incorporate as much of the relevant data you need in the field into our new design including a location for the PEI value of each pump. The new design also provides a more accessible location for our Taco Tag, giving you all of the digital support you may need.

You can see the difference in layout between the old and new design below. Fields to note are the DOE Basic Model No., PEIcl, and Taco Tag placement.

The DOE Basic Model No. is provided for easy cross reference of your qualifying Taco pump with the DOE energy rating data base at er.pumps.org.

As PEI values are uploaded into the Hydraulic Institute database, we’ll begin to include the HI Energy Rating Label in the document package shipped with each pump.

Pumps have already started shipping with the new nameplate!

If you have any questions about the new nameplates or how it might impact you, please reach out to us at sales@buymeinc.com or call us at 800-355-7061.

One of our most trusted brands, Patterson-Kelley, provided us with this great explanation breaking down turndown in commercial boilers.

Boilers are rated on thermal efficiency, which is simply the chemical energy added to the boiler, divided by the energy added to the boiler water. As more energy is transferred from the hot gas into the boiler water, the thermal efficiency increases and the temperature of the hot gas decreases. Turndown ratio plays a key role in this energy transfer. Many engineers and owners have been intentionally mislead regarding turn-down ratio’s and this article will dispense with the misleading information and down right nonsense about turn-down ratios and efficiencies!

Almost all boilers are tuned to add excess air, which ensures ideal combustion of the fuel for proper air-fuel mixing. The excess air can also prevent the burner from overheating by “pushing” the combustion flames off the burner.

When energy from the hot gasses is transferred to the boiler water, the gas temperature dips below the dew point, which causes vapor to become liquid. The energy released from the conversion is picked up by the boiler water and results in a significant boost in efficiency.  Every pound of condensate from flue gases condensing adds approximately 1000 btu’s to the boiler water. However, dry flue losses and loss of vapor can result in energy loss.

Energy loss can be readily calculated if the amount of CO2 and O2 in the flue gas and the stack temperature is known.

 With the evolution of boiler technology, manufacturers have found a way to offer units with multiple firing rates, and units that can modulate seamlessly between fixed low fire rates and fixed high fire rates. The fixed fire rates are defined as the boiler turndown capacities, and modulation is accomplished by reducing the air and gas flow into the boiler.

The benefit of this modulation is threefold; it reduces cycle losses, it reduces the wear on the components, and it can potentially lead to higher thermal efficiencies.

Impact of Turndown

This begs the fundamental question – wouldn’t a boiler with extreme turndowns be much more efficient than one with 5:1 turndown?  The answer to that is ‘NO’! And the proof of that is a simple engineering calculation that anyone can verify for themselves (shown below).

To achieve high turndowns the boilers are tuned to deliver greater amounts of excess air at low firing rates to keep the burner from overheating. The additional excess air will significantly reduce the dew point of the water in the flue gas and alter the losses in the dry gas.  To illustrate this effect, the example used in Figure A is updated to reflect a 20:1 turn down where the O2 is set to 11% (corresponding to a CO2 of 5.6% and 97% excess air).  The results are highlighted in Figure B below.

Note that the dew point has been lowered from 130.6° F to 117° F  and the boiler is no longer in the condensing range.  This represents a 3.7% DECREASE in overall efficiency and this is just the beginning of the bad news! 

When excess air well above 50% is used in the boiler, it impacts the stability of the combustion flame which can lead to excessive flame failures, nuisance trips and cycle losses.

The P-K Analysis

Realistic boiler modulation rates have helped improve the overall boiler system efficiency from reduced cycle losses and increased thermal effi­ciencies. Extreme turndown produces the opposite effect. Boil­er plant designs must factor in actual (not extrap­olated) boiler efficiencies through the firing range of the equipment and matching the expected plant loads with the right boiler size selections.

Interested in learning more? Reach out to us at sales@buymeinc.com

Going to be at the 2019 AHR Expo?

Dave Connors, Patterson-Kelley’s Trainer and National Accounts Manager will be giving an exclusive presentation at the 2019 AHR Expo. Be part of his “The Dirty Little Secret Associated with High Turndown” presentation to get a new perspective on the controversial topic.

Join Dave Connors on Wednesday, January 16th between 1:45 PM and 2:05 PM at Theater A – Room C101 of the Georgia World Congress Center. 

As an owner or as a design engineer, you want to be sure that your boiler selection will operate at peak efficiency, under all conditions. Thermal efficiency is simply the chemical energy added to the boiler, divided by the energy added to the boiler water. As more energy is transferred from the hot gas into the boiler water, the thermal efficiency increases and the temperature of the hot gas decreases. Turndown ratio plays a key role in this energy transfer. Many engineers and owners have been intentionally misled regarding turndown ratio’s and this article will dispense with the misleading information and down right nonsense about turndown ratios and efficiencies!

Patterson-Kelley, one of our most trusted brands of boilers, has published a blog post on the advantages and disadvantages of high turndown. We are sharing that post below as well as their explanation of how Patterson-Kelley will introduce 10:1 turndown without sacrificing system efficiency.

Commercial Boiler Efficiency

Placing system efficiency at the forefront of commercial boiler acquisition continues to be a trend in the heating and water heating industry. Manufacturers are racing ahead to push the limits of technology by offering aggressive turndown capabilities approaching, and even exceeding 20:1, at the detriment of system efficiency.

In an age where energy conservation is important and condensing boilers are increasingly being adopted, the dewpoint plays an important role in system efficiency because it determines whether the boiler will condense or not, as well as how much condensation will occur. The dewpoint is the atmospheric condition below which water droplets condense and dew can form, releasing heat that can then be absorbed back into the system. Condensation can occur at up to 130º F depending on pressure and humidity. The returning water in the heating system is used as the cooling medium; as the temperature of the returning water drops, the amount of condensate increases.  The potential amount of condensate estimated at 100,000 BTU’s per hour is one gallon, if the boiler is operating at reduce temperatures.

Heating System Flexibility

Although heating systems are designed to meet peak loads, they spend most of their run-time hours off peak. Along with efficiency, flexibility is an important factor in boiler operation. As the building loads change, the heating system must be flexible enough to change with it. In the instance where the heating system is sized at a higher capability than is required, the flexibility of a boiler could accommodate the imbalance by turning down the input to match the load. This has become the key driving factor in the high turndown story.

Traditionally, turndown has been the limiter of efficiency. To maintain stable flames, excess air is introduced which depresses the dewpoint of natural gas. The dirty little secret associated with high turndown is that, in most cases, the boiler is no longer condensing.

Aggressive turndown capabilities usually lower the dewpoint and reduce the window of opportunity to condense due to excess air. The 970 BTU/lb. of condensate that engineers expect to get from the system, will continue to go straight up the flue.

Excess air to achieve highest possible efficiency:

  • 5 – 10% for natural gas
  • 5 – 20% for fuel oil
  • 15 – 60% for coal


A Patterson-Kelley Solution

Due to technology improvements, Patterson-Kelley will introduce 10:1 turndown capabilities for the first time during 2019. Patterson-Kelley has achieved higher turndown with a unique process that allows the gas valves to reliably turn down without adding large amounts of excess air, resulting in flexibility and efficiency. This method delivers a 10:1 turndown rate while preserving the dewpoint of a 5:1 turndown rate, which helps maintain high condensation levels. This higher turndown capability will provide designers the ability to match input to building loads without sacrificing reliability. No more nuisance flame failures that have traditionally plagued high turndown boilers.

You can see the original post here.

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The Benefits of Aluminum Commercial Boilers

How to Perform Annual Maintenance on a Boiler

Best Practices for Boiler Maintenance

 

 

We’ve been talking about how important it is to perform annual maintenance on your clients’ equipment. Boilers, as you know, are subject to wear and tear. They need adequate maintenance, to ensure that they don’t break down. If they do, it’s usually at a very inconvenient time and it makes you look bad to your customers.

Waiting until something breaks down before repairing and maintaining it, always ends up costing you far more money with unhappy clients, higher labor rates, rush parts orders, etc. because it’s usually during peak service demand, or in the middle of the night, or on a weekend. Usually, you end up in scramble mode trying to fix a problem that could have been avoided with regular care. Providing regular maintenance programs to your customers, is also a good way to build long-lasting customer relationships and add a consistent revenue stream for your business.

To help, here’s a video on how to perform the annual maintenance on a Patterson-Kelley SONIC Condensing Boiler.

If you have any further questions or need parts, please give us a call at 800-355-7061.

It’s frustrating when you can no longer get the parts needed to repair your equipment. With all of the energy and environmental regulations coming out of Washington these days, manufacturers are constantly required to update technologies and efficiencies with their equipment, and sometimes something that’s less than five or ten years old has become “obsolete” for the manufacturer.

The decision of whether to buy new or repair existing can be a tough one. According to Consumer Reports, a good rule of thumb is if the repair costs exceed 50% of the cost of replacing with new product. You should also consider taking advantage of new technology with smart features and boosted efficiencies. Many can provide money back to your customer from local utility companies.

However, if replacement isn’t an option for you, and the part(s) you need are obsolete or just very hard to find, we can usually help you find a new part or configure something to keep your customer’s equipment running smoothly. We work miracles on a regular basis, now we’re trying to figure out how to do the impossible!

To help find a replacement part for you, there are three main questions we ask to help guide us to the right solution.

  1. If your equipment has or is a motor, what amperage is being used? Motors and pumps usually have a data plate mounted on the equipment.
  2. If it’s a pump, what is the GPM and head pressure?
  3. If it’s a boiler, what are the capacities of the heating system?

Whatever kind of equipment you’re working on, when you are calling for parts, the more information about the piece of equipment or system that you can provide, the faster we can source the correct part for your use.

Challenge us! Give us a call at 800-355-7061.

Have you been misinformed about aluminum boilers?

Patterson-Kelley, one of our most trusted brands of boilers, has published a blog post on the myths and misinformation surrounding aluminum boilers and how they are actually beneficial.

Aluminum is one of the best heat exchanger materials and Patterson-Kelley wants to prove it, joining the ongoing industry debate between aluminum and stainless steel boilers.  We are sharing their article here but you can see the original on their site as well –  “Breaking the Stigma on Aluminum Boilers”.

Changing the Perception of Aluminum Commercial Boilers

The commercial heating industry has faced an ongoing debate on the benefits of stainless steel heat exchangers versus aluminum heat exchangers. The process of choosing a new boiler has become confusing for both building owners and engineers.

The amount of conflicting information has led many boiler manufacturers to pick a side, and the perception of aluminum heat exchanger boilers has been misconstrued in the process. Yet, there is no clear evidence or proof that either material is superior to the other.

The heat exchanger is the part of the boiler that uses heat generated from fuel combustion to raise the temperature of heating water. Both aluminum and stainless steel condensing boilers achieve high efficiency by condensing water vapor in the exhaust gases and recovering its latent heat, which would otherwise be wasted. With condensing flue gases comes highly acidic water, which can adversely affect the fired heating surface. During the heating process, impurities and contaminants, like chloride and pH levels, can directly affect the water chemistry in the boiler. Regardless of the heat exchanger material (aluminum or stainless steel), EVERY boiler should be introduced and maintained with the appropriate air and water quality to prevent corrosion and scaling.

In this blog we will focus on the benefits of owning an aluminum commercial boiler, with the intention of breaking the stigma created by the ongoing debate. Keep in mind that Patterson-Kelley offers both, aluminum and stainless steel options, which places our team in an unbiased position.

Why Choose an Aluminum Commercial Boiler?

  1. High thermal conductivity
    • According to the Kent’s Mechanical Engineers’ Handbook, the thermal conductivity of pure metals is inversely proportional to absolute temperature. Thermal conductivity is an important factor when selecting a heating unit because it defines the velocity at which heat passes through the material. Aluminum is considered a high purity metal and it is 8x better at thermal conduction than stainless steel. Even though aluminum heat exchangers require thicker walls in a commercial boiler application, it is also lighter in weight and it has a high strength to weight ratio. The thickness of the heat exchanger does not negate the heat transfer advantages.
  2. Large Waterways
    • Large surface areas and water channels can deliver lower hydraulic resistance. This means that the water moves slowly through the heat exchanger which allows the returning water temperatures to absorb potential heat, resulting in higher efficiency. A cast aluminum heat exchanger design with large waterways also makes the system more tolerant to variable system conditions, including flow rate settings.
  3. Corrosion Resistance
    • In contact with fresh water, the corrosion rate of aluminum is relatively high. However, after a few weeks, aluminum features a protective layer of aluminum oxide film, which significantly reduces the corrosion rate as well as the risk of oxidation. This layer is highly resistant to corrosion caused by acidity.
  4. Longevity & Manufacturing Flexibility
    • The thickness of the heat exchanger walls can greatly improve the longevity of unit. Aluminum is also known for being flexible, versatile and economical. It provides casting capabilities, allowing extended heating surface areas with limited volume without compromising heat transfer rates.

Both MACH Engines

Aluminum and stainless steel are both great heat exchanger materials and have excellent properties. The uniqueness of the commercial boilers is not only based on the material of the heat exchanger, but how the components work together. The key factors to monitor in a commercial boiler application, regardless of the heat exchanger material, include operation, water quality, air and fuel. These components will affect the life expectancy and maintenance requirements of the heating unit(s).

If you have any further questions on the benefits of aluminum vs. stainless steel boilers, please give us a call at 800-355-7061.

 

We wanted to share with you that Nexus Valve products are now listed by one of the most widely used engineering specification services in the industry – Product MasterSpec. This should make it easier for you to find and specify exactly what Nexus Valve products you need for your hydronic system.

Click on the image link to download a copy of division 232116 – HYDRONIC PIPING SPECIALTIES – to insert into your master specification.

 

 

As always if you can’t find what you are looking for, please give us a call at 800-355-7061.

One of our most popular product lines, Taco, is a member of the Hydronic Industry Alliance – Commercial which is a non-profit alliance of hydronic equipment manufacturers and partners operating in North America. The alliance operates under the principle that water is the most efficient and greenest energy transfer medium on the planet, and they serve as a resource within the HVAC and Service Water Heating industry. Their mission is to educate, integrate, and communicate the advantages of Hydronic System Solutions.

As part of that mission, they have launched a new campaign targeting rejecting VRF systems. In an ongoing effort to expose building owners, architects and design teams to the multitude of issues that can arise by choosing to install VRF systems, the Hydronic Industry Alliance has created a website, supported by an advertising campaign in popular industry publications and websites, which highlights the major concerns and presents first-hand experiences of those brave enough to come forward to speak about their poor VRF experiences.

The VRF industry is spending millions of dollars advertising the falsely-claimed superior energy efficiency of their systems. They are changing the business model of how systems get designed and are trying to change codes and safety protocols to allow for even greater amounts of refrigerants to be piped throughout a building.

The Hydronic Industry Alliance wants the design community to think twice before blindly choosing a VRF system over the many other viable HVAC options, like hydronics, that will almost always better meet the design, budget, safety, comfort and performance goals of the building. The hydronics industry deserves a seat at the design table, before an HVAC system type is chosen, to tell why water always wins – for everyone.

In the coming months, we will see additional information, support materials and case studies coming out of the Hydronic Industry Alliance in regards to VRF systems, the benefits of hydronics, and new design tools to make it even easier to choose the right HVAC systems. As we get this information, we will pass it along to you. In the meantime, make sure to visit www.VRFrejected.org to learn the truth about safety, energy costs, efficiency, and the proprietary nature of VRF systems.

While we support our customers with any of their needs, we encourage you to look at alternatives to traditional VFR systems when designing and building your next hydronic system. If you have any questions on this, please give us a call to discuss at 800-355-7061.

You know how every company has a “Go-To Guy”? The one with all of the answers? Well, at Mechanical Equipment our “Go-To Guy” is Dean Powrozek. Have you talked with him lately? You should, because he’s a tremendous resource that’s available to our customers for consultations on projects, products specs, and product recommendations.

How did Dean get to be so knowledgeable?

As Operation Manager for Mechanical Equipment, helping with Inside Sales and Customer Service, Dean draws on his extensive background in the industry. He has done everything from driving a truck to project management to becoming a Vice President of a large Mechanical Contracting company.

In fact, Dean has worked with several well-known companies in the Chicagoland area. He spent 17 years with Wagner Heating & Ventilation, and then he worked for a family owned mechanical contractor, Denning & Simonetti. Following that he was the Vice President and General Manager for International Piping.

Dean decided to retire in 2013 which later became a tremendous opportunity for Mechanical Equipment.

“I made the mistake of retiring in February,” Dean said. “That was a bad time because after sitting around inside for several months I wanted to go back to work.”

Dennis O’Shaughnessy, Mechanical Equipment’s founder, said, “Dean called me and said he was tired of retirement, and would like to come work at Mechanical Equipment. He and I had developed a strong customer / supplier relationship, when I called on him as a customer. I was always impressed with how organized he was, how smoothly his projects went through, and frankly, we also became friends. That was the best part of our working together. I immediately offered him a position here, and because of his knowledge of both the piping side and air side of our business, hiring Dean has been one of the best decisions I’ve ever made! He handles our inside sales of pumps, and boilers, he runs our warehouse and delivery schedule, he field measures all of our Sterling radiant products like fin-tube, radiant ceiling panels, etc. He can do it all, and he does! Whenever something needs to get done, Dean just picks it up; no questions asked.”

Dennis added, “He can relate to our customers’ needs, because he’s literally been in their same position. He knows the deadlines they face, the angry customers they’re trying to satisfy and the importance of deadlines that many of the contracts have included, so getting equipment on time is his highest priority.

Dean said, “I never thought I would get a charge out of sales but I love the challenge of being able to help our customers and see how much money I can save them at the same time.”

What can you expect when you call Dean?

Answers. He knows the industry, he has a lot of contacts, and he likes being able to help people solve their problems. Dean said, “I know that if I can’t answer a question I can reach out to my contacts in the industry to get answers. I like being able to offer that to our customers.”

You can also expect a quick turnaround on those answers. “When I was a mechanical contractor, if I could make just one phone call to get the pricing and answers I needed so I could move on to the next issue, that was a tremendous help,” he said. “I always had that experience when I called Mechanical Equipment as a customer, so now I strive to provide that level of quick service to Mechanical Equipment’s customers as well.”

Need pricing or have a question on a complex project? Give Dean a call at 800-355-7061 and see why he’ll quickly become your “Go-To Guy.”

Do you take care of your boilers, with a regular maintenance program? If not, you should. Boilers, like cars or any other mechanical devices, are subject to wear and tear. They need adequate maintenance, to ensure that they don’t break down because if they do, it’s guaranteed NOT to be at a convenient time to repair it. Waiting until something breaks down before repairing and maintaining it, always ends up costing you far more money, unhappy residents, higher labor rates, etc. because it’s usually during peak service demand, or in the middle of the night, or on a weekend. Usually, you end up in scramble mode trying to fix a problem that could have been avoided with regular care. Providing regular maintenance programs to your customers, is also a good way to build long-lasting customer relationships and add a consistent revenue stream for your business.

Annual maintenance and monthly water quality checks can prevent premature malfunctions and potential boiler breakdowns caused by poor water quality, leaks or water pressure. Any boiler’s functionality can be easily compromised and impact energy efficiency which creates a large bill for your customers.

So, what are some best practices to keep boilers operating in peak condition? Here are 8 annual maintenance steps you can take to help maintain energy efficiency and extend the life of your boiler.

  1. Replace all parts affected by wear and tear, every year!

Our PK annual maintenance kit includes all parts that need to be replaced, including gaskets to re-seal the combustion inspection covers that you need to remove in order to clean the fire-side. Right now, we’re offering a limited time 20% discount on our Patterson-Kelley Boiler Annual Maintenance Kits (part #BP-0000-0345) until September 15th. 2018. Order yours today.

  1. Inspect the fireside of the heat exchanger

After 2,500 hours of operation, or at least once a year, you should inspect the fire-side of the heat exchanger. You can access the fireside by removing the inspection covers. Any fireside fouling should be removed by using clean out tools and water washing the fireside surface. A thin coat of mineral oil can be used on an aluminum boiler to help minimize potential fouling in between annual maintenance checks. Verify that no debris came loose and fell to the bottom, potentially clogging the air path.

  1. Remove the burner, thoroughly wash and clean the mesh

This should be done even if the burner appears to be clean. After washing the burner; reinstall it and use the fan test option to blow dry the burner. DO NOT fire the burner while wet.

  1. Replace old igniter, flame rod and gaskets

These parts are included in your maintenance kit. It is important that you DO NOT reuse old gaskets.

  1. Select the righT Water Treatment to Prevent Scale

Water side scale is equivalent to having a thin film of insulation between the furnace gases and boiler water. It can drop a boiler’s efficiency by as much as 12% – 21%.

  1. Re-start the equipment and adjust combustion using a calibrated analyzer

A water tube manometer will be necessary to check for proper draft readings.

  1. Inspect electrical connection for corrosion

Condensation can cause corrosion on the electrical connections of a boiler. Check for broken or cracked fusers and replace anything that looks questionable, then test the unit. It is also important to ensure that the electrical connections are tight.

  1. Clean the condensate trap

Once again, the condensate produced by condensing natural gas boilers is corrosive. The condensate trap must be cleaned annually and inspected for potential leaks.

You can also download this checklist from Patterson-Kelley on how to design the system to ease annual boiler maintenance.

Mechanical Equipment is your local Patterson-Kelley representative, and you can call us anytime if you have questions, concerns or would like to order a Patterson-Kelley Boiler Annual Maintenance Kit. Call before September 15th to get 20% off!  800-355-7061.